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JSC Files on Predator Frequency Bands III

April 19, 2010

JSC-CR-04-066
Joint Spectrum Center

Predator UAV Line-Of-Sight Datalink Terminal Radio Frequency Test Report

Prepared for
AIR COMBAT COMMAND
UAV Special Mission Office (ACC/DR-UAV)

September 2004

Prepared by
Steve Bonter, Diana R. Dunty, Jason Greene, and Dr. William Duff
Alion Science and Technology

Distribution authorized to US Government agencies only

The Predator Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) line-of-sight command link and return link frequency assignments permit the simultaneous operation of four General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Incorporated (GA-ASI) Predator air vehicles
at the Indian Springs Air Force Auxiliary Field (ISAFAF).

With increased operations of the RQ-1/MQ-1 Predator, and the introduction of MQ-9 Hunter-Killer (Predator B®) operations, a requirement was identified for the simultaneous operation of seven Predator UAVs at ISAFAF and an additional set of frequencies for ground test.

The Air Combat Command UAV Special Mission Office requested that the Joint Spectrum Center investigate ways to satisfy the Predator frequency requirements. The Joint Spectrum Center, with support from the Aeronautical Systems Center and GA-ASI, performed transmitter spurious emissions, transmitter emission bandwidth, transmitter broadband noise, receiver sensitivity, receiver selectivity, receiver adjacent-signal rejection, and receiver gain compression measurements of the datalink terminals. This report describes the test efforts and presents the test results. The data in this report was current as of 30 July 2004.

————

JSC-CR-98-019
Supplement 1

Joint Spectrum Center
Supplement 1Common Data Link Frequency Migration Study

Prepared for
Aeronautical Systems Center
Reconnaissance Systems Program Office,
Sensors and Data Links
Common Data Link Program Office

October 2004

Consulting Report
Prepared by
Jonathan Timko, Ronald Mendolera, Joshua Gleason, and
Adekunle Adegorusi
Alion Science and Technology

Distribution authorized to the Department of Defense and DoD contractors only

The CDL system is a family of communication links designed to provide real-time connectivity and interoperability between multiple intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance collection platforms operated by the DoD and Government agencies. The CDL family is divided into five link classes.

• Class I: Ground-based applications with airborne platforms operating at speeds up to Mach 2.3 and altitudes up to 80,000 ft.

• Class II: Airborne applications with speeds up to Mach 5 and altitudes up to 150,000 ft.

• Class III: Airborne applications with speeds up to Mach 5 and altitudes up to 500,000 ft.

• Class IV: Terminals in satellites orbiting at 750 nmi.

• Class V: Terminals in relay satellites operating at altitudes greater than 750 nmi.

The CDL system is a full-duplex communication link that includes a forward link and a return link. The forward link is used to communicate command and control functions between the processing (surface) terminal and the gathering (airborne) terminal. The return link transfers sensor data from the airborne terminal back to the surface terminal.

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JSC-PR-04-044
Joint Spectrum Center

Common Data Link EMC Analysis

Aeronautical Systems Center
Reconnaissance Systems Program Office,
Sensors And Data Links
Common Data Link Program Office
September 2004

Prepared by
Adekunle Adegorusi, Jonathan Timko, and Ron Mendolera
Alion Science and Technology

Distribution authorized to the Department of Defense and US DoD contractors only

The Aeronautical Systems Center Common Data Link (CDL) Program Office requested that the Joint Spectrum Center (JSC) conduct an electromagnetic compatibility analysis between the CDL communications-electronics equipment and Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) systems. The JSC identified FSS systems that operate in the 13.75 – 15.63-GHz frequency range.

Two analyses were performed to determine the potential for electromagnetic Interference (EMI) between the CDL and the various FSS systems
due to in-band and adjacent-band interference. For the CDL interfering with FSS systems, an analysis considering the CDL interfering with a -20-dB and -8.5-dB I/N criteria were conducted.

For FSS systems interfering with the CDL, a qualitative analysis was performed for the FSS system interfering with a -12-dB I/N criterion. An initial cull analysis was performed using mainbeam antenna gains. The initial cull analysis interactions were placed into one of two categories: “EMI not Predicted” or “EMI Predicted.”

Interactions in the EMI predicted group were analyzed further by taking into consideration mainbeam-to-sidelobe, sidelobe-tomainbeam, and sidelobe-to-sidelobe antenna coupling.

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